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2012 Statewide Juried Virtual Showcase (Gallery 19: C E Morse | Harvey Spears | Mark Ford)


 














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Art-Gallery-19

C E Morse - Cumberland Center, ME (web) | Untitled | Photograph

C E Morse - Cumberland Center, ME (web)
Fine Art Photographer

Untitled | Photograph

Artist Statement: "'Trying to define yourself,' Tennessee Williams once said, 'is like trying to bite your own teeth.' That being said, I have loved antique cars since I was a boy. My first car was a 1936 Pontiac. My second was a 1929 Essex. Thus began trips to boneyards for parts. At first I brought only tools, but while retrieving axles, fenders, window cranks, or other odd parts, I discovered in all the twisted rusted metal, images that rivaled the best of abstract paintings. I started bringing my 35mm SLR and I was hooked. It was life imitating art—I was finding Kandinskys and Rothkos in the wild. It changed the way I looked, not only at boneyards, but at the rest of the world. Random events throughout our lives shape our vision and abstract images can connect with our past, both consciously and subconsciously. I am intrigued by observing the collusion of nature and man as it unknowingly creates accidental images, and I enjoy a perverse amusement that a lot of these compositions are comprised of what you might overlook, what would be deemed ugly: erosion, disfigurement, rust, and rot." -- C E Morse

Call 207-415-3763 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Harvey Spears - Falmouth, ME (web) | "Snowy Red Wall" | Photograph | 20"X13"

Harvey Spears - Falmouth, ME (web)
Fine Art Photographer

"Snowy Red Wall" | Photograph | 20"X13"

Artist Statement: "Landscape, wildlife and fine art photography is the main focus of my work. I am inspired by an important principle that I learned from my study of Aesthetic Realism, the education founded by Eli Siegel: 'The world, art, and self explain each other: each is the aesthetic oneness of opposites.' I hope to encourage wonder and respect for the world through showing, sometimes with humor, that within the breathtaking is the ordinary, and also how there is grandeur and mystery in what can be met everyday." -- Harvey Spears

Call 917-887-6408 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Mark Ford - Portland, ME (web) | “Chestnut Street Parking” | Archival Inkjet Print on Epson Watercolor Paper | 14"X9"

Mark Ford - Portland, ME (web)
Fine Art Photographer

“Chestnut Street Parking” | Archival Inkjet Print on Epson Watercolor Paper | 14"X9"

Artist Statement: "I learned to take pictures from an architectural photographer who taught me to photograph buildings much like people, from their best side and in the best light. While still architectural in many respects, my subject matter of late is just as much the patina of age. I hope viewers notice the space I leave for the tried, tired and true, and for the imperfections that are part of our everyday environment. While many of my images could be called minimal, in the sense that there are only a few formal elements to the composition, they are not pure or pristine. Looking closely, the viewer will see many traces of age, use and debris. In fact, it is the imperfection that I love, the minor details that, to my eye, make these images stronger (and, dare I say, more real) than they would otherwise be." -- Mark Ford

Call 207-712-3520 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it















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Original virtual art gallery concept and design by Thierry H. Bonneville.
Copyright © 2008-2012 MAINE ART SCENE, LLC | All Rights Reserved. Do Not Duplicate.

More Information about the Maine Artists in this Gallery


C E Morse – Cumberland Center, ME (web)

Photographer

Untitled | Photograph

Artist Statement: "'Trying to define yourself,' Tennessee Williams once said, 'is like trying to bite your own teeth.' That being said, I have loved antique cars since I was a boy. My first car was a 1936 Pontiac. My second was a 1929 Essex. Thus began trips to boneyards for parts. At first I brought only tools, but while retrieving axles, fenders, window cranks, or other odd parts, I discovered in all the twisted rusted metal, images that rivaled the best of abstract paintings. I started bringing my 35mm SLR and I was hooked. It was life imitating art—I was finding Kandinskys and Rothkos in the wild. It changed the way I looked, not only at boneyards, but at the rest of the world. Random events throughout our lives shape our vision and abstract images can connect with our past, both consciously and subconsciously. I am intrigued by observing the collusion of nature and man as it unknowingly creates accidental images, and I enjoy a perverse amusement that a lot of these compositions are comprised of what you might overlook, what would be deemed ugly: erosion, disfigurement, rust, and rot." --C E Morse

Call 207-415-3763 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Harvey Spears – Falmouth, ME (web)

Photographer

"Snowy Red Wall" | Photograph | 20"X13"

Artist Statement: "Landscape, wildlife and fine art photography is the main focus of my work. I am inspired by an important principle that I learned from my study of Aesthetic Realism, the education founded by Eli Siegel: 'The world, art, and self explain each other: each is the aesthetic oneness of opposites.' I hope to encourage wonder and respect for the world through showing, sometimes with humor, that within the breathtaking is the ordinary, and also how there is grandeur and mystery in what can be met everyday." --Harvey Spears

Call 917-887-6408 or email This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Mark Ford – Portland, ME (web)

Photographer

“Chestnut Street Parking” | Archival Inkjet Print on Epson Watercolor Paper | 14"X9"

Artist Statement: "I learned to take pictures from an architectural photographer who taught me to photograph buildings much like people, from their best side and in the best light. While still architectural in many respects, my subject matter of late is just as much the patina of age. I hope viewers notice the space I leave for the tried, tired and true, and for the imperfections that are part of our everyday environment. While many of my images could be called minimal, in the sense that there are only a few formal elements to the composition, they are not pure or pristine. Looking closely, the viewer will see many traces of age, use and debris. In fact, it is the imperfection that I love, the minor details that, to my eye, make these images stronger (and, dare I say, more real) than they would otherwise be." --Mark Ford

Call 207-712-3520 or e-mail This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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1 comment

  • Comment Link Pepi Rouleau Friday, 06 April 2012 06:52 posted by Pepi Rouleau

    I recognize the "distressed" look from an old living space from years ago. So nice to see the image reduced and clarified like a Chef's secret sauce. It's been transformed and polished. I could recognize your signature anywhere. Your mark has always been indelible. The signs of a great artist. Bravo!

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